Housing in the Evolving American Suburb
Housing in the Evolving American Suburb

Housing in the Evolving American Suburb

ARCHITECTURE

54 Pages, 8.5 x 11

Formats: Paperback

Paperback, $14.95 (US $14.95) (CA $19.95)

Publication Date: December 2016

ISBN 9780874203967

Price: $14.95
 
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9780874203967
 

Overview

Suburban housing markets across the United States are evolving rapidly and overall remain well-positioned to maintain their relevance for the foreseeable future as preferred places to live and work, even as many urban cores and downtown neighborhoods continue to attract new residents and businesses. Suburban housing dynamics increasingly reflect some of the most profound issues shaping our society, including aging, immigration, economic mobility, and evolving consumer preferences. As a result, suburbs will generate substantial residential development and redevelopment opportunities— and challenges—in the years ahead. This title describes different kinds of suburbs based on the key factors that define and determine their housing markets. The report classifies and compares suburbs in the 50 largest metro areas in the U.S. and assesses the key issues that will shape suburban residential demand and development in the future. Suburban housing markets across the United States are evolving rapidly and overall remain well-positioned to maintain their relevance for the foreseeable future as preferred places to live and work, even as many urban cores and downtown neighborhoods continue to attract new residents and businesses. Suburban housing dynamics increasingly reflect some of the most profound issues shaping our society, including aging, immigration, economic mobility, and evolving consumer preferences. As a result, suburbs will generate substantial residential development and redevelopment opportunities— and challenges—in the years ahead. Housing in the Evolving American Suburb describes different kinds of suburbs based on the key factors that define and determine their housing markets. The report classifies and compares suburbs in the 50 largest metro areas in the U.S. and assesses the key issues that will shape suburban residential demand and development in the future.

Author Biography

Stockton Williams is Executive Director of the ULI Terwilliger Center for Housing. Mr. Williams leads the strategic direction of the Center and the design and implementation of its initiatives, which span a broad range of housing issues, including affordable/workforce, senior, and market-rate housing. He is most recently the author of the ULI publication Preserving Multifamily Workforce and Affordable Housing: New Approaches for Investing in a Vital National Asset and co-author of The Economics of Inclusionary Development. Mr. Williams has more than 20 years' experience in housing and economic policy, research, advocacy, and development and has held senior leadership positions in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Before joining ULI in January 2015, he was Managing Principal of the Washington, D.C., office of HR&A Advisors, which advises cities across the U.S. on complex real estate and economic development projects. Prior to joining HR&A, Mr. Williams served as Senior Advisor in two Federal Cabinet agencies: the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Department of Energy. He has also been Senior Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer at Enterprise Community Partners; a Senior Advisor at Living Cities; a Senior Legislative and Policy Associate at the National Council of State Housing Agencies; and a developer of affordable housing. He is Chairman of the Board of Groundswell, an innovator in harnessing community economic power for the common good. He holds an M.S. from Columbia University and a B.A. from Princeton University.